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Reality Therapy by William Glasser Book Review

Reality Therapy by William Glasser Book Review


Hello and HAPPY DAY! How does slowing down sound to you today? Would you like to reduce the noise for just
a bit? Are you ready to make a choice and decide
to listen? My name is Igor, SF Walker. I am here to remind people to slow down. To reduce the noise. To walk their lives into a natural flow. Welcome back to the Book of the Week series. Every week as I read another amazing title,
I share it with the world. Today we look at: Reality Therapy: A New Approach
to Psychiatry by William Glasser M.D. Responsibility, a concept basic to Reality
Therapy, is defined as the ability to fulfill one’s needs, and to do so in a way that
does not deprive others of the ability to fulfill their needs. A responsible person also does that which
gives him or her a feeling of self-worth and a feeling that he or she is worthwhile to
others. Action can be called realistic or unrealistic
only when its remote as well as immediate consequences are taken into consideration
and compared, weighed. If the evil, pain, suffering which ultimately
occur as a result of a given action exceed the immediate satisfaction which it produced,
that action may be termed unrealistic; whereas, if the satisfaction which ultimately occurs
as a result of an action is greater than the immediate effort or sacrifice associated with
it, such an action can be called realistic. In the final analysis, it is the capacity
to choose wisely between these two types of behavior that we call reason; and it is what
characterizes truly educated man, one who knows and can properly appraise the consequences
of own actions. It is generally accepted that all humans have
the same physiological and psychological needs. Competent people may describe or label these
needs differently, but no one seriously disputes that in all cultures and in all degrees of
civilization men have the same essential needs. It is also generally accepted that needs do
not vary with age, sex, or race. A Chinese infant girl has the same needs as
a Swedish king. The fulfillment of the physiological needs
for food, warmth, and rest are rarely the concern of psychiatry. Psychiatry must be concerned with two basic
psychological needs: the need to love and be loved and the need to feel that we are
worthwhile to ourselves and to others. Helping patients fulfill these two needs is
the basis of Reality Therapy. Happiness occurs most often when we are willing
to take responsibility for our behavior. Irresponsible people, always seeking to gain
happiness without assuming responsibility, find only brief periods of joy, but not the
deep-seated satisfaction which accompanies responsible behavior. See an immediate, assured source of pleasure
is never willingly given up for a larger but uncertain remote satisfaction. The job of a great therapists is to become
involved with the patient and then get them to face reality. When confronted with reality by the therapist
with whom the person is involved, that person is forced again and again to decide whether
or not they wish to take the responsible path. Reality may be painful, it may be harsh, it
may be dangerous, but it changes slowly. All any man can hope to do is to struggle
with it in a responsible way by doing right and enjoying the pleasure or suffering the
pain that may follow. Unfortunately for taxpayers as well as patients,
almost all teaching of psychiatry, psychology, and social work follows traditional thinking
that considers the diagnosis of mental illness to be essential to successful treatment. Millions of dollars are spent annually in
an attempt to diagnose types of mental illness in the vain hope that the diagnosis will be
helpful in treatment. All too common of an event is where you can
hear residents argue whether a certain patient is neurotic because he fears to leave the
house, or psychotic because he imagines that an unseen enemy will attack him if he steps
outside the door. In either case he suffers from the inability
to fulfill his needs. Whether he is afraid of reality (conventionally
described as neurotic) or denies reality (psychotic) makes little difference in his life and no
difference in treatment. The argument over labels helps no one. Patients have been treated with conventional
psychiatry until they know the unconscious reason for every move they make, but they
still do not change because knowing the reason does not lead to fulfilling needs. It is wishful thinking to believe that a man
will give up a phobia once he understands either its origin or the current representation
of its origin in the transference relationship. He continues to have the phobia because of
some present irresponsible behavior that may or may not be directly related to the origin
of the phobia. When a person acts in such a way that they
give and receive love, and feel worthwhile to self and others, this persons behavior
is right or moral. Lets start focusing more on moral behavior,
on responsible behavior and human needs psychology and how we satisfy human needs, instead of
focusing on labels dealing with nothing more than symptoms. Please help out, its easy, simply like this
video so more people can enjoy it. Share it too and spread the word. Subscribe to my channel and stay up to date. Link to this book is in the description below. Buy it. Read. Never stop learning. Thank you
Love&Respect

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