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Integrated care in every community

Integrated care in every community


Every day millions of people get great care
from committed staff working in England’s health and care system. But over the years
our needs have become more complex and our services must adapt to tackle them. One in three people admitted to has five or
more conditions compared to one in ten a decade ago As a nation we are getting older and more
people need help living with a range of conditions rather than simply needing one-off treatment. There are half a million more people over
75 than in 2010 and there will be two million more in 10 years time Hospital is not always best for an older person
– an 80-year-old can age 10 years in 10 days through lost muscle strength. Yet many people needing
general care at home find themselves staying in hospital, despite not needing intensive
medical attention. We also need to adapt to changing needs among young people. One in ten of our children suffer mental health
problems, which can impact for life if not addressed early. A fifth of children are obese by the time
they leave primary school, with diabetes already consuming around 10 per cent of the health
budget. These complex mix of problems across a wide range of ages cannot be solved by individual
institutions alone. So the NHS, local councils and others are joining forces to form health
and care partnerships – in every neighbourhood, town and area of England. The aim is to integrate care, making services
more: JOINED UP – improving care for people with incurable conditions; PREVENTATIVE – anticipating illness and acting
early; AND PERSONAL – helping people take more control of their health. We want every individual to live healthily
for as long as possible and to get high-quality joined-up care when needed. Right now, old divides – between health
and social care, physical and mental health, GPs and hospitals – mean many experience
disjointed services. By creating joined-up teams – of doctors, nurses, therapists and care workers – we can
better look after a person’s whole needs. And by working more closely with communities,
we can help people to start life well, live well and keep well. To find out how your health and care system
is working together visit:  www.england.nhs.uk/integratedcare

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