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DFA In Your Community

DFA In Your Community


Today we are visiting a community. Many
people living with Alzheimer’s disease or another form of dementia continue to
live in their community and may face these challenges: becoming increasingly
isolated, difficulty managing household chores such as preparing meals or
collecting mail, signs of personal neglect, such as weight loss, becoming
lost or disoriented in the neighborhood, difficulty completing activities, such as
buying groceries or scheduling doctor appointments. Here’s what you can do to
help someone in your community: be aware of the person’s body language and your
own smile and make eye contact, include the person living with dementia in the
conversation, greet people warmly, tell them your name even if you believe they
may know you, ask yes and no questions and be specific for example: rather than
here it is, say here is your hat. If communication is difficult reassure the
person that it’s okay and encourage them to continue, if someone appears to be in
danger notify a family member or authorities to let them know what you
observe, if the individual appears lost ask if he or she needs help, check to see
if the individual is wearing an emergency response system such as a
medic alert Alzheimer’s Association safe return bracelet or necklace, which will
have a phone number you can call for help Alert authorities if you have concerns for the person’s safety and stay with
the individual until help arrives. If you are in a store or business and observe
someone who needs help here’s what you can do: offer to assist with finding an
item or find a staff person to help, offer to help count the correct change,
gently inquire if you notice unusual items or quantities, offer to call a
friend or family member if someone appears to need assistance returning
home. If you are in a library and observe someone who needs help
here’s what you can do: offer to help or find a librarian to
assist, ask the library staff if they have any special resources for people
living with dementia, be specific concrete and speak slowly when you
communicate. If you are in a restaurant and observe someone who needs help
here’s what you can do: if someone needs help ordering ask specific questions, for example: would you like to order a
sandwich, versus what do you want to order, if he or she needs assistance
paying, offer to help count the correct change, if someone waiting for a ride
home, assist by calling a friend or family member, if you can, wait with the
person until their ride arrives. If you are on public transportation and observe
someone needing help here’s what you can do: remain calm and reassuring speak
slowly try to understand where the person is going, ask for an address,
try to ensure that they arrive at their intended destination, offer to call a
friend or family member, or notify a staff person or manager who can assist,
alert authorities if you have concerns for the person’s safety.

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