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Client Family Community Education | Addiction Counselor Exam Review Episode 14

Client Family Community Education | Addiction Counselor Exam Review Episode 14


hey there everybody and welcome to this
installment of addiction counselor exam review podcast Please remember to SUBSCRIBE. In this episode we’re going to examine the counselors function in providing
client family and community education identify the benefits of outreach and
education and identify qualities of effective education efforts learning is defined as a change in
behavior that can occur at any time or in any place as a result of exposure to
environmental stimuli so that is a really long-winded version for saying
people can learn to change anywhere anytime they just have to have more
information more tools and that’s what the counselor can do is provide those
tools that’s the environmental stimuli that’s the counselor standing up there
talking the handouts we give the books that are available whatever the teacher
and learner jointly perform teaching and learning activities how does that work
well you know what every time I walk into a classroom I don’t know what each
person in their nose and they don’t know what I know so I start teaching and then
they educate me about what they need more information on so I can tailor my
approach to meet their needs and sometimes they have information that I
don’t have so we work together collaboratively counselors are often
called upon to teach daily living skills to increase patience level of
Independence so we can help people learn how to balance a checkbook how to ride
the bus how to you know call their insurance company anything that they
need to learn how to do health educators provide information to individuals and
communities on a variety of important topics including biological medical and
physical aspects of substance abuse safety HIV nutrition general medical
conditions smoking pregnancy and mental health
now as counselors we can also step in there and help some with providing
information about aspects of mental health and recovery success is measured
not by how much content has been imparted by how much but by how much
person has learned I can stand up there for an hour or more and talk and talk
and talk and provide a ton of information but if people walk out and
they haven’t gotten anything out of it then that was not a successful
presentation if I get up there and I talk for an hour about one concept and
the people that are in that room walk out of that room and they
know that concept and they understand it and they can apply it then I’ve been
successful so success involves making sure that your audience understands and
learns the concept that you’re trying to impart they can’t apply it until they
learn it client and family community education is the process of providing
clients families significant others and community groups with information on a
variety of topics this can include prevention health and
wellness resilience behaviors signs of substance abuse recovery options there’s
a whole lot of things that we can provide education about an education is
not therapy education is providing people information about resources and
tools and ideas so if we’re talking about communication skills for example
you can do an education presentation on that and help people learn what
assertive communication is learn what assertive communication looks like
compared to passive and aggressive they can learn how to be assertive what does
it sound like what does it look like they can roleplay being assertive so
they’re learning this skill they’re not dubbing deep into their past issues
about anything they’re learning a skill the role of educator encompasses many
knowledge and skill sets such as understanding and applying the
principles of learning theory and we’re going to talk about these in a few
minutes using specific teaching skills to accommodate individual learning
styles and making adaptations for culture age and linguistic ability among
learners anytime you do a group whether it’s a psycho ed group or you’re
teaching in the community are you doing a library presentation you’re going to
have a variety of people with a variety of different backgrounds and needs so
it’s important that you’re able to try to connect with each person on some
level educational groups help engage the client in treatment and recovery and are
much less threatening because it’s easier to learn than to change well we
want them to change yes we do they’ve got to learn first so if we
engage them in this learning process and they feel empowered when they’re
learning then there are going to feel even more empowered when they start
trying to apply that information to change and they’re going to have
developed that rapport and engagement with you during this less threatening
process of learning so they are more willing to rely on you during the change
process characteristics of adult learners they’re engaged in multiple
roles they may be parents they may be employees they are somebody’s child they
are somebody’s friend maybe somebody’s spouse there are a lot of different
things that they are they have more life experiences than say children so we
don’t have to explain down to the enth detail everything but on the other hand
you know they can contribute a lot they can say oh that reminds me of a time
when or is it like when this happens and they can relate it to something
meaningful to them they need a safe environment in which they don’t have to
be afraid to be wrong so we want to encourage participation if they’re not
working with the material if they’re not trying to apply the material they’re
probably not going to remember the material their self-directed and don’t
want to be spoon-fed they want you to ask them questions they want you to
provide some information and then help them figure out okay now what do I do
with this they don’t want you to do it for them their relevancy oriented so if
you’re teaching a concept like self-esteem which you know people are
like okay that’s good but how does it benefit me to get them to understand and
learn the material you have to bring it back and help them understand what’s in
it for me when we teach and in in my class on teaching adult learners we
talked about the fact that for people to learn information first they have to get
it in their mind so that’s through seeing hearing or doing you know they
get it in their mind then they have to process it
and figure out what to do with it and then they have to decide is this even
important enough for me to make room in my memory banks for it so we have to
make sure that it’s relevant when people go to meetings for example and they’re
like oh I hate going to those meetings I just get nothing out of them or whatever
I encourage them to start going to meetings with the intention of getting
one thing out of the meeting so they go and when they’re leaving the meeting I
want them to write down in their in their journal what is the one thing that
you got out of this meeting and it could be something that they don’t want to do
but they need to get something out of the meeting and figure out how it’s
relevant to their recovery adultery problem solvers and want to know how new
information can be applied in a practical setting so when we’re teaching
these skills when we’re teaching about self-esteem and communication skills
well those are all great for you and let’s talk about how they can help you
in your relationships and how they can help you at work but let’s also talk
about how you can teach them to your kids so they have these skills and it
can help them as they grow they need to feel part of a learning community which
provides both encouragement and serves as a sounding board for ideas anxieties
and concerns so when we’re doing this group and if you’re doing a one-hour
seminar at the library and you’re never going to see these people again this is
a little bit harder to develop but if you’re doing a an ongoing
psycho-educational series you know we really want the people to work together
so break them out into small groups and have them do activities so they’re
working together and they’re encouraging each other and they’re developing an
understanding that you know other people have questions and concerns and
anxieties adults are motivated to learn in order to cope with with specific
life-changing events they want to learn what do they need to do you know okay
I had a baby how do how do I do this now you know I am motivated to learn and
whenever I go through a change in my life like after I
my son I ordered like every book I could find on having babies that were in the
neonatal intensive care unit when I started my farm I ordered every book I
could find on having a small homestead farm and we’re motivated to learn about
things that are relevant when our life changes and were motivated to learn when
we have a use for the knowledge or skill being sought so again you have to make
it relevant why do I care education is provided in a variety of ways in court
including formal classes handouts and informal meetings people can learn in a
bunch of different ways they can learn through podcasts they can learn through
videos they can learn through books they can learn through talking to somebody
they can learn through classes it’s a matter of how they prefer to learn print
electronic and other multimedia educational materials have become
increasingly available a lot of times you don’t have to reinvent the wheel you
can go online and find worksheets on depression or anxiety or assertiveness
skills or life skills or whatever it is so a little searching and you can find a
lot of the resources that you need you can also encourage clients to before
group go online or after group before the next group go online and find three
resources that pertain to the particular topic when you’re doing client education
though you need to be sensitive to the characteristics and needs of the
different clients that are in your group their family and significant others so
if we’re doing education about relapse prevention we need to be sensitive to
who’s in the group when we used to do family education at the facility that I
taught at Family Education the kids would be there the grandparents would be
there the parents would be there you know we had people of every single age
and every single ability that were that were in that room a lot of times so as a
matter of figuring out okay now how do I present to this crew and keep everybody
engaged and so we wanted to pay attention to the
physical and environmental needs you know could they hear us adequately was
it an environment that was safe for the children to be running around we held it
in the cafeteria so it was safe was it comfortable for people to sit in and a
lot of times we would only have adult sized chairs so the kids would be
sitting up there swing in their legs and you know they wouldn’t have anything to
do so we started leaving some of the cafeteria tables out and giving the kids
coloring books that they could work in while they were while we were doing the
educational lecture portion timing and scheduling is important you know kids
and older adults tend to have some shorter attention spans so you want to
pay attention to how much time can this person focus and make sure that you’re
not overdoing it you don’t want to do a three-hour group cognitive and learning
abilities are paramount if you’re doing a group has adults and children you know
you need to remember that children don’t think the same way that adults do so you
may need to present things in a different way to the kids if you’re
talking about the roles of the family in the addicted family the mascot the hero
you know those are fun things I guess you can say to act out to do skits on
and you can ask kids you know what is a mascot and what does a mascot do and a
lot of times if you focus on the children and get them engaged the
parents and the grandparents kind of get engaged because they’re watching the
children get engaged so they’re learning by association but you want to pay
attention to what people are able to comprehend people who are in early
recovery they’re in detox or just got out of detox may not be able to
comprehend some things they may still be a little foggy so it’s important to give
handouts at this point in time because they may not remember a lot but they can
go back and review their handouts later and then ask questions pay attention to
language if English is not the primary language then making sure that
you either have an interpreter or you go slowly enough and you provide
information in their native language when possible when you’re talking with
children again remember they have a lot of children when I’m talking about the
young ones they haven’t achieved formal operational thought so they think very
concretely so you don’t want to use a lot of metaphors and you know examples
that are up here you want to use examples that they’ve seen that they’ve
experienced in order to understand what’s going on language
talked about that and cultural you want to pay attention to what different
cultures think and what their opinions are about this particular topic some
cultures have very distinct opinions about mental health and mental illness
and substance abuse and what a person should do and shouldn’t do so you want
to be cognizant of that if you are prescribing any sort of support
behaviors or anything like that to be sensitive to the fact that in this
culture this is how addiction is handled or this is how depression is handled
educational sessions are typically offered in 60 to 90 minute blocks just
because that’s easy you know people don’t want to come all the way to your
facility for twenty minute class but some people have difficulty maintaining
attention for that long I know I do if you’re doing a block like that you want
to try to chunk it so no more than ten or fifteen minutes of lecture and then
have them do an activity or you know a start asking some questions and then do
another chunk of teaching and then application sessions usually consist of
a lecture and exercise and are presented with media supplements you want to have
things present your concepts so people can see them they can hear about them
and then they can work with them they can apply them in scenarios or apply
them to their own life start out with the lecture portion in 10 or 15 minutes
this is the way my groups go ten or fifteen minutes
of this is what we’re talking about today
then we do an exercise and so people can practice applying it and then I asked
them okay knowing this material now knowing this
concept or tool how could it have benefited you last week and have them
talk about that and then we go back around the room and I say okay now that
you know this material and you see how it can benefit you how are you going to
remember to use it and how do you see using it in the upcoming week so they’re
working with it and applying it to their life educational topics we might talk
about include addiction as a biopsychosocial disease so it affects
the body it affects the mental your mental health and it affects your
relationships we can talk about the recovery process life skills health
behaviors relapse warning signs and triggers resources available for clients
family and community members to support the person and recovery and to prevent
addiction so what resources are out there that we can start providing to
people to prevent them from even developing this problem and what
resources are out there for people who also have domestic violence issues or
for people who have transportation issues help them get linked up and know
how to find those services and we may talk about recovery planning what does
that look like what is this transition going to be like when somebody leaves
residential treatment for example and how are is the person you know how are
you going to stay clean sober and healthy and what is needed from your
support system to help you stay clean sober and healthy so remember that each
learner absorbs and retains information differently learning style as I
mentioned earlier refers the way the person takes in that information and
some people do it by reading or by seeing something some people do it by
hearing by lecture by podcast and some people just have to work with the
information so the example I usually give people to help them identify what
type of learner they are I say you know when you
a new phone or a new device at home how do you figure out how to work it do you
have somebody tell you and just listen do you read the manual or watch youtube
videos or do you just start pushing buttons until you figure out how to make
it work challenges to learning are things that
we need to deal with learning and memory deficits are often present in people
who’ve been abusing substances when they’re still in that fog so we need to
consider this when we’re choosing the teaching approach used and the amount of
information given at any one time and again if people are still in a fog or
for some reason have issues some cognitive issues providing a handout so
they can review it later even if visual learning is not their
primary learning style that will give it give them something they can review and
then they can ask questions or they can look it up further on the internet the
matrix model of outpatient treatment which you can find on the Samsa website
illustrates an approach that recognizes impairments and delivers information to
the client accordingly the matrix process is gradual the focus is always
on the present court issues aren’t immediately addressed and complex
information is provided in smaller units and presented in steps first you need to
do this you need to make a list of things then you need to go over the list
with your counselor and then you know it’s presented in small manageable steps
that the person can do so they’re not trying to remember or manage multiple
things other challenges to learning include the age of the learner older
learners may experience a decline in vision hearing short-term memory skills
and reaction time so if you’ve got older learners in your group moderate the pace
of the presentation periodically take breaks even if you’re just taking a
break you know for example to go over to your water bottle and take a drink that gives them a
chance cognitively to catch up some people are also reflective learners
and they need that break anyway even if they’re not older have both visual and
auditory formats so if they’re having trouble seeing they can hear it and if
they’re having trouble hearing they can see it if you’re working with an older
population try to make sure that the text that you’re using is big enough you
know if you’re writing on a whiteboard it’s going to be big enough try to make
it legible and if you’re talking to a group that may have some hearing
impairments make sure when you’re speaking you’re speaking to them not
talking to the whiteboard and hoping that they can hear you you know make
sure that they see your face and they can see your lips basically look for
nonverbal signs of confusion or boredom if they start fidgeting or looking
quizzically at you you know stop and you can either ask them you know is there
something I can clarify or you can back up you know maybe you realize that you
made a huge leap there and you need to back up and apply it or give an example
one of the first things I do in order to avoid calling people out right away if
they’re not going excuse me is if I see somebody looking quizzically at me I
will give an example of how to use the topic or an give an example of what
we’re talking about if we’re talking about passive aggressive behavior you
know I may act out what that might look like so people can say oh okay
I know what you’re talking about now because we don’t always call it the same
thing you know there are different phrases and terms for different things
provide enough time to complete any assignments so if you’re breaking people
out in group to do something make sure you’re giving them enough time to do it
so they don’t feel hurried when they do it they’re going to remember it so you
know give them time to actually use all their senses to get that knowledge in
their brain when you have younger learners they may
not have the same level of cognitive emotional or social development nor the
attention span of an adult you know think attention span is roughly
equivalent up to about age ten of the age of the child so a two-year-old is
gonna have about a two minute attention span and a ten-year-old is gonna have
about a ten minute attention span and some people are lucky enough to develop
longer attention spans after that I don’t think I ever did but you know so
we want to work with the people on in chunks that are proportional to how long
they can you know really pay good attention so again
chunk it and this is really helpful even with adults anymore
most adults prefer small chunks of information to three minute YouTube
videos or a 10 minute presentation followed by an activity instead of a
whole bunch of lecture like a college class or something use developmentally
appropriate materials and activities if you’re working with kids you know use
art therapy use physical activities let them act things out they’re not going to
be able to write an essay they’re not going to be able to get up in front of
the room and teach a concept gamify it when at all possible to make it more fun
do hangman or a developmentally appropriate game an eight-year-old
probably doesn’t know how to play jeopardy so you want to choose something
that they are familiar with Jenga is a great one if you want to put certain
concepts on the blocks then when they pull the blocks out they’ve got to read
what’s on the block or give it to you to read if they can’t read yet look for um
make activities interactive and encourage participation so encourage
people to share their thoughts and their feelings and you know periodically stop
if you’re working with a younger audience and ask them you know if
everybody understands or how everybody’s feeling or can who in here can give me
an example of that the best way when you’re working with adults and with
chill is instead of putting it out there who
can do this is to put people on the spot so you want to make sure people are
comfortable before you put them on a spot but if you feel like that’s a
better way to go then you can go okay Sammy can you give me an example of this
and June what is one question you might have about this and have them feel a
little bit more obligated to participate especially in adult groups if you say
does anybody have any questions they’re all gonna look at you with this
blank stare like can we go yet so instead of doing that pick people out
and ask them you know what question they might have or how they think they could
apply it or something where you know you’re gonna get some sort of response
and provide enough time to complete any psychomotor tasks so if you’re having
them draw a picture of their family for example make sure to give them you know
a good ten minutes to do it so they have time you don’t want to say alright
you’ve got five minutes let’s go go go go go go
it takes them two or three minutes just to sit down at the table and get their
crayons and everything out teaching strategies according to Dale’s Konev
experience and this is evidently important for you to remember for your
test adults generally remember 90% of what they do so we want to have people
work with the material we want to have them complete workbook entries we want
to have them talk about how they could apply it we want to have them teach it
may teach a little part of it maybe to the group we want to have them act it
out in skits we want to have them do it manipulate it they remember 70% of what
they say and write so you know have them talk about things talking groups propose
questions and and ask for solutions to issues they remember 50% of what they
hear and see so our lecture is good but they’re only
going to remember about 50% of it so just bear that in mind when you’re
trying to teach something they remember 30% of what they see alone
so if you’re reading something like think about the last time you followed a
recipe or you read a recipe online and you weren’t actually in the kitchen
doing it how much of that recipe did you remember you know probably not much but
if you actually were following it in the kitchen then you probably remember a
little bit more of it we remember 20% of what we hear and 10% of what we read so
it’s important to really help people if they’re reading something like the big
book they want to periodically stop and apply that you know why is this
important to me why did it make it into the big book how can I relate to this
and you can do that through discussions you can do that through having them fill
out journal entries most people hate journal entries so discussions are often
better and you know if we’re talking about what they say that gets us up into
that 70% area so you want to make sure people are manipulating the material
cognitively and you know working with it teaching from a multicultural
perspective is also important and recognizes that there’s a classroom of
learners who vary according to their social and cultural characteristics so
culturally responsive teaching is defined by how the educator develops
teaching approaches to address the cultural knowledge prior experiences and
performance styles of diverse students so if you’re working with a group who is
of Asian descent and you’re working with a group who is you know of white descent
Caucasian descent you know they may have different experiences they may not but
they may depending on you know if you’re working over with a group over in
Thailand and you’re working with a group over in Idaho in the United States you
know they’re going to have different experiences so we need to pay attention
to that it acknowledges the legitimacy of cultural heritage and different
ethnic groups and it also acknowledges the legitimacy of different perspectives
on recovery on health on healing on mental illness it builds bridges of
meaningfulness between social and learning experiences so people can see
how learning this information can help enhance their relationships and their
functioning in the world out there it uses a wide variety of instructional
techniques that are connected to different learning styles we’ve talked
about those teach us students well let’s go back to that a second we’ve talked a
lot about helping people manipulate the material and apply it and teach it and
skits and that well we’re talking about visual give them handouts give them
written word give them pictographs those are helpful have them create pictographs
or collages that represent what’s going on that’s visual and when we’re talking
about hearing there’s lecture but then there’s also discussion so encourage
discussion between people one of the things I used to do when I taught at UF
for our final exam and even our midterm I would hand out the exams and then I
would break people into groups of four and they would be able to discuss each
question and what they thought was the correct answer to the question now
everybody chose their own answer but they were able to bounce ideas off of
one another so it was easier for them and it helped them solidify that
information in their mind culturally responsive teaching teaches students to
know and embrace their own and each other’s cultural Heritage’s we want to
focus on you know what are some similarities but what are some unique
differences that are really cool and awesome about this other culture it
incorporates multicultural information resources and materials in the subjects
and skills so we want to make sure that we’re providing information that’s
culturally sensitive culturally responsive teaching diversity and
motivation : culturally responsive teaching is the name of a book that
provides specific culturally responsive teaching strategies so if you work in a
diverse treatment center this is a great book to have in your arsenal
culturally responsive teaching guidelines you want to communicate
respect you know cuz you’re not gonna know every culture just just understand
that when you go into a room you’re not gonna know the culture of every person
in there it doesn’t matter where you are so communicate respect give your person
give yourself permission to feel uncomfortable with a culture that is new
to you develop listening skills and never be shy about asking if you’re
being understood or asking for the clients cultural perspectives such as
how would this be viewed or approached in your culture one of the places that I
used to live was the national headquarters for the Hari Krishna’s and
you know I was very unfamiliar with that culture so when working with people who
are Hari Krishna in counseling you know there was a huge learning curve for me
and instead of going well I’ll know what to do with this talking with them and
going okay help me understand your cultural values as they relate to
marriage relationships and as they relate to whatever issue we were
discussing so I could understand what was important to them for more
information on cultural competence view the videos improving cultural competence
parts one two and three on our youtube channel at all CEUs com /youtube so
that’s three hours worth of cultural information let’s talk a little bit more
about psychoeducation cuz we’re gonna do a lot of that especially if you work in
a clinic setting psycho ed is health education combined with behavioral
counseling the counseling component deals with emotions or perceptions
coping relaxation and self-care so we’re gonna talk about you know how do you how
do you feel about this particular technique how would you feel
practicing that this technique when we talk about this concept what feelings
does it bring up for you and what perceptions do you have it teaches
people about their problems how to treat them and recognize signs of relapse
it teaches coping strategies and problem-solving skill
two families friends and caregivers to help them deal more effectively with the
individual in recovery psychoeducation typically consists of a highly
structured format providing problem-focused or skill building
education in one or two hour time limited groups and that’s that’s a long
time two hours is a really long time so one hours usually what most people can
handle and you want to follow a structure of building upon skills and
tools there’s opportunity for discussion of the presented material but there’s
very little to processing of personal issues so like I said in my groups I
would teach the concept and then you know maybe unhooking from your emotions
that would be the concept for the group and then I would go around the room and
I say how might this have been helpful for you last week and they can talk
about a situation where they may that may have been appropriate we’re not
talking in depth about what happened we’re just talking about how that skill
would apply and then how do you see yourself applying this in the upcoming
weeks and you know tell me more about that so we’re not going into depth in
depth on any trauma or issues and if the client starts to go there you know there
are you’ll learn ways to help redirect them and get them you know to a place
where it’s not monopolizing the group at that point and then you either excuse
them so they can go see their primary therapist if they have to do that right
then or make sure they understand that their their struggle is very valid and
you hear them and you will make time after group to talk to them groups are
not a good option for people who are unable to maintain confidentiality
people who engage in antisocial behaviors gossiping back talking hateful
behaviors and people who are not motivated to participate in treatment
because they’ll be more disruptive you know very rarely are they just gonna sit
through group if at best they’ll fall asleep but that can even be triggering
especially to people who are recovering from opiate
addiction counseling groups have more ambiguity
emphasize emotions and learning outcomes are individualistic not for the group as
a whole so a counseling group is really going to focus on those past issues and
what each person gets out of it is going to be different when people walk out of
a psycho-educational group we hope they all got roughly the same information
effective psychosocial education interventions need to have elements of
practicality concrete problem-solving incremental shaping of skills so what
does that mean that means we don’t expect them to have
it mastered by the time they walk out we want them to know okay there are these
six steps to developing self-esteem for example so what is the first step you’re
gonna take and you know how are you gonna do that and help them work through
the process and it identifies specific attainable goals what are you gonna do
between now and next week benefits derived from psychoeducation include
mastery experiences and increased levels of personal empowerment for the clients
psycho-educational strategies enhance people’s sense of dignity and
self-esteem because we’re giving them increased responsibility for self-care
we’re not saying I need to do this for you we’re saying here are the tools you
got this and we’re placing a higher level of trust in their hands we’re
saying I know you can do this I know you can cope with this I know you can solve
this problem psycho education increases individuals resilience to distress it
provides coping skills improves their ability to comprehend and manage their
own life and improves their sense of meaning in life when we deliver psycho
education we are responsible for fostering information transfer to make
sure that they’re getting what we’re saying we want to facilitate emotional
discharge now we’re not talking about you know gushing emotions we’re not
talking about a therapy group but we want them to connect it with a feeling
and see how this tool can help them deal with their emotions we want to provide
information about medication or other treatment
regimens that can help people and sometimes this is a standalone group on
its own and we want to provide assistance towards self-help
so what resources are out there that can help you learn this skill a little bit
better family psycho-educational groups help family members prevent the
individual with the substance abuse or co-occurring disorder from relapsing and
provides them with information they need and the coping skills that will help
them with their loved ones disorder recovery is a family process so we need
to educate the family on okay Jim Bob used to react this way to stress you
know maybe he’d had no coping skills at all and these are the coping skills that
he’s learned and this is how he’s going to try to react now and this is how you
can support him in these new behaviors an associated goal is supporting the
family’s burdens including financial social and psychological burdens in
dealing with the loved ones substance abuse issues so we want to help them
reach out to those resources that can help them help the person recover and we
want to help them reach out to resources that can help themselves recover
addiction impacts everybody in the family it’s not just an identified
patient like somebody who breaks their leg
you know addiction really has an impact on everybody and everybody is probably
going to have some issues that they need to deal with either in self-help groups
or mutual support or actual counseling and therapy counselors function in
providing client family and community education to aid in the prevention early
intervention and post treatment transition periods so there’s a lot we
can do we can do prevention activities in the community the great thing about
that is we are going to provide information that can help prevent mental
health and substance abuse problems but we also connect with people who may be
experiencing these issues and we’re a friendly face and that makes it more
welcoming for them to come to treatment early intervention services you know
these are great because we’re getting in there before this is whatever the issue
is has really significantly disrupted their life and a lot of work can be done
in early intervention providing skills and tools because other things are still
there other foundational supports are still there so early intervention
provides a lot of skills and tools additionally outreach and education are
cost effective and can be provided in a variety of places within the community
including community centers churches libraries and schools effective
education efforts are developmentally appropriate culturally responsive
presented continuously throughout the continuum of services from prevention
all the way through maintenance and relapse prevention designed to provide
practical information to clients and their families and community members who
are there to help them well thank you for it listening to today’s podcast and
stay tuned for next week’s installment all of us at all CEUs wish you great
success on your exam once you’re certified or licensed please remember to
visit all CEUs for all of your continuing education needs we offer
unlimited CEUs for $59 for addiction and mental health counselors social workers
and marriage and family therapists if you’re still thinking about becoming an
addiction counselor all CEUs offers the training you need in three different
formats you can choose online multimedia self study self study plus live webinars
or even face to face weekend intensives which meet one weekend per month for 12
months we can even present a training series at your facility just email
support at all CEUs calm to schedule it to learn more you can also visit all
CEUs dot-com /a sir that’s all CEUs dot-com /a c e are thank
you

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